https://youtu.be/tz24KHcwpxI https://youtu.be/vKMrWsjUOZQ 1 KG680 Graduate Internship Preparation Lesson Plan: Week 4 Week 4 Topic and Assignment: Goal Setting

1
KG680 Graduate Internship Preparation
Lesson Plan: Week 4

Week 4 Topic and Assignment: Goal Setting

Welcome to Week 4:

At the end of this week, students will be able to:

• Describe types of goals

• Explain future career goals

• Critically analyze and apply the 5 steps process for setting and achieving goals

I. Topic: Goal Setting (Smith, 2013).

1. “Goals serve as road maps. They give us a long-term vision and short-term

motivation.

• They focus our acquisition of knowledge and help us to organize our time and

resources.

• Goals are the plans detailing how to get from point A to point B in a logical

sequence.”

2. “Goal setting is a powerful process for thinking about your future, motivating

yourself, and turning your vision of the future into reality.

• The process of setting goals helps us choose where we want to go in life.

• By knowing precisely what we want to achieve, we know where … to

concentrate our efforts.

• We’ll also quickly spot the distractions that would otherwise detract us from
our course.

• More than this, properly set goals can be incredibly motivating. As we get into

the habit of setting and achieving goals, we will find that our self-confidence

builds immensely from recognizing our own ability and competence.”

2
KG680 Graduate Internship Preparation
Lesson Plan: Week 4

Week 4 Topic and Assignment: Goal Setting

A. Introduction/Lecture Notes (Harris, 2021):

Read and familiarize yourself with this 5-step Process for setting and achieving

your career goals as you prepare this week’s assignments:

1. Set the goal

2. Write down the why behind the want (Why do you want to achieve this goal?)

3. Identify the obstacles you will have to overcome to achieve these goals

4. Identify the people and organizations who can help

5. Assign specific dates to achieve your goals

B. Goal Setting Using SMART Goals (Odom, 2019).

To make sure your goals are clear and reachable, each one should be:

1. Specific: When working through your goal, consider the five “W’s”; who, what,

where, when and why.

• Who is involved?

• What do I want to accomplish?

• Where do I want to accomplish it?

• When (time frame)? Which requirements and constraints exist?

• Why do I want to accomplish this goal (purpose/benefits)?

2. Measurable: It’s important to have measurable goals, so that you can track

your progress and stay motivated. Assessing progress helps you to stay

focused, meet your deadlines, and feel the excitement of getting closer to

Odom, A. (2019). Goal setting the SMART way. https://www.angelaodom.com/blog/goal-

setting-the-smart-way

SMART is an acronym that you can use to guide your goal setting.

Its criteria are commonly attributed to Peter Drucker’s Management by Objectives concept.
The first known use of the term occurs in the November 1981 issue of Management
Review by George T. Doran. Since then, Professor Robert S. Rubin (Saint Louis University)
wrote about SMART in an article for The Society for Industrial and Organizational
Psychology. He stated that SMART has come to mean different things to different people, as
shown below.

To make sure your goals are clear and reachable, each one should be:

• Specific (simple, sensible, significant).
• Measurable (meaningful, motivating).
• Achievable (agreed, attainable).
• Relevant (reasonable, realistic and resourced, results-based).
• Time bound (time-based, time limited, time/cost limited, timely, time-sensitive).

Professor Rubin also notes that the definition of the SMART acronym may need updating to
reflect the importance of efficacy and feedback. However, some authors have expanded it to
include extra focus areas; SMARTER, for example, includes Evaluated and Reviewed.

How to use SMART

1. Specific

When working through your goal, consider the five “W’s”; who, what, where, when and
why.

• Who is involved?
• What do I want to accomplish?
• Where do I want to accomplish it?
• When (time frame)? Which requirements and constraints exist?
• Why do I want to accomplish this goal (purpose/benefits)?

Example: After my most recent primary care appointment, I should really lost about 20 lbs,
lower my blood pressure, and strengthen my core. I want to do this to look better in and
out of my clothes and feel better about myself. This was the first health report that really
scared me. I don’t want to have to take prescribed medicine in the near future. The
constraints are that I don’t like to cook at home, therefore I eat out 3 or 4 times a week and
don’t take the time to go to the grocery store.

2. Measurable

It’s important to have measurable goals, so that you can track your progress and stay
motivated. Assessing progress helps you to stay focused, meet your deadlines, and feel the
excitement of getting closer to achieving your goal.

A measurable goal should address questions such as:

• How much?
• How many?
• How will I know when it is accomplished?

Establish concrete criteria for measuring progress toward the attainment of mini-goals. Set
target dates along the way. How will you know when you have accomplished your goal?

Example: Lose 21 lbs. over the next 7 months (and keep it off) = monthly goal of 3 lbs.
Since my blood pressure was high (linked to stress and emotiona













1
KG680 Graduate Internship Preparation
Lesson Plan:  Week 4

Week 4 Topic and Assignment:  Goal Setting

Welcome to Week 4:  
At the end of this week, students will be able to:

• Describe types of goals

• Explain future career goals

• Critically analyze and apply the 5 steps process for setting and achieving goals

I. Topic: Goal Setting (Smith, 2013).

1. “Goals serve as road maps. They give us a long-term vision and short-term

motivation.

• They focus our acquisition of knowledge and help us to organize our time and

resources.

• Goals are the plans detailing how to get from point A to point B in a logical

sequence.”

2. “Goal setting is a powerful process for thinking about your future, motivating

yourself, and turning your vision of the future into reality.

• The process of setting goals helps us choose where we want to go in life.

• By knowing precisely what we want to achieve, we know where … to

concentrate our efforts.

• We’ll also quickly spot the distractions that would otherwise detract us from
our course.

• More than this, properly set goals can be incredibly motivating. As we get into

the habit of setting and achieving goals, we will find that our self-confidence

builds immensely from recognizing our own ability and competence.”




2
KG680 Graduate Internship Preparation
Lesson Plan:  Week 4

Week 4 Topic and Assignment:  Goal Setting

A. Introduction/Lecture Notes (Harris, 2021):

Read and familiarize yourself with this 5-step Process for setting and achieving

your career goals as you prepare this week’s assignments:

1. Set the goal

2. Write down the why behind the want (Why do you want to achieve this goal?)

3. Identify the obstacles you will have to overcome to achieve these goals

4. Identify the people and organizations who can help

5. Assign specific dates to achieve your goals

B. Goal Setting Using SMART Goals (Odom, 2019).

To make sure your goals are clear and reachable, each one should be:

1. Specific: When working through your goal, consider the five “W’s”; who, what,

where, when and why.

• Who is involved?

• What do I want to accomplish?

• Where do I want to accomplish it?

• When (time frame)? Which requirements and constraints exist?

• Why do I want to accomplish this goal (purpose/benefits)?

2. Measurable: It’s important to have measurable goals, so that you can track

your progress and stay motivated. Assessing progress helps you to stay

focused, meet your deadlines, and feel the excitement of getting closer to




Odom, A. (2019). Goal setting the SMART way. https://www.angelaodom.com/blog/goal-

setting-the-smart-way

SMART is an acronym that you can use to guide your goal setting.

Its criteria are commonly attributed to Peter Drucker’s Management by Objectives concept.
The first known use of the term occurs in the November 1981 issue of Management
Review by George T. Doran. Since then, Professor Robert S. Rubin (Saint Louis University)
wrote about SMART in an article for The Society for Industrial and Organizational
Psychology. He stated that SMART has come to mean different things to different people, as
shown below.

 To make sure your goals are clear and reachable, each one should be:

• Specific (simple, sensible, significant).
• Measurable (meaningful, motivating).
• Achievable (agreed, attainable).
• Relevant (reasonable, realistic and resourced, results-based).
• Time bound (time-based, time limited, time/cost limited, timely, time-sensitive). 



Professor Rubin also notes that the definition of the SMART acronym may need updating to
reflect the importance of efficacy and feedback. However, some authors have expanded it to
include extra focus areas; SMARTER, for example, includes Evaluated and Reviewed.

How to use SMART

1.  Specific

When working through your goal, consider the five “W’s”; who, what, where, when and
why.

• Who is involved?
• What do I want to accomplish?
• Where do I want to accomplish it?
• When (time frame)? Which requirements and constraints exist?
• Why do I want to accomplish this goal (purpose/benefits)?

Example: After my most recent primary care appointment, I should really lost about 20 lbs,
lower my blood pressure, and strengthen my core.  I want to do this to look better in and
out of my clothes and feel better about myself.  This was the first health report that really
scared me. I don’t want to have to take prescribed medicine in the near future.  The
constraints are that I don’t like to cook at home, therefore I eat out 3 or 4 times a week and
don’t take the time to go to the grocery store.

2.  Measurable

It’s important to have measurable goals, so that you can track your progress and stay
motivated. Assessing progress helps you to stay focused, meet your deadlines, and feel the
excitement of getting closer to achieving your goal.

A measurable goal should address questions such as:

• How much?
• How many?
• How will I know when it is accomplished?

Establish concrete criteria for measuring progress toward the attainment of mini-goals. Set
target dates along the way. How will you know when you have accomplished your goal?

Example: Lose 21 lbs. over the next 7 months (and keep it off) = monthly goal of  3 lbs.
Since my blood pressure was high (linked to stress and emotiona

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